One of my biggest regrets…

While looking at all of the pictures of our old house, all the memories that came flooding back to me made me realize that I do have a regret from my childhood.

I should have lived every day to it’s fullest.  It was the outdoor adventures that gave me the most memories. There were sunny days that I spent inside playing with my Johnny West figures or working on my model train set. I should have spent those days enjoying the sun, watching clouds, playing in the creek, and seeing what wonders nature had produced. That other stuff could have waited for rainy and winter days.

I did spend a lot of time outside, but it could have been more. Sometimes when I read Calvin and Hobbes comics I think “Wow, did that kid know how to live.” They say hindsight is 20/20, but boy do I wish I could get another crack at being a kid.

How about you? Do you every wish you could do it all over again?

My Old House

I will apologize in advance as this post will probably be extremely boring to most people. This post is more for myself than anyone else. I wanted to store some memories.

My Old House pic 1
My Old House pic 1

This is the first house that I remember growing up in. My dad didn’t own it, but he rented this place. The window at the top floor was the bedroom for me and my brother.  You can’t see it here, but to the left of the house was an old water well with a hand pump that worked. We would also lay in that part of the yard to do our cloud watching. You see a lot of amazing shapes and images in clouds.

The lower left window was the kitchen table area. (I can’t remember what room was on the right.) And if you have followed my post for any amount of time, that gravel curve is where I wiped out on my bicycle (first day without training wheels) and pushed my two incoming front teeth back up into my skull. The dentist said they would come right back down… and they did. I really like the big tree in the front yard. I have always loved huge trees.

My Old House pic 2
My Old House pic 2

This view would be facing away from the house at the previous picture’s location. That was our swing set. I remember one year bumblebees built a nest in the pipes and my dad had to smoke them out. The landlord had horses in the barn and we were able to ride them. I can only really remember one horse, so maybe there was only one, but his name was “Corky”.

My Old House pic 3
My Old House pic 3

Talk about a lot of room to run around. The yard here was huge. And those three trees you see are apple trees that we use to play in. They were great trees for climbing. I have to admit though, I hated picking up all those apples out of the yard. But it was nice to be able to walk out back and pick a red apple right off the tree when they were in season.

My Old House pic 4
My Old House pic 4

This is the last one. You can see to the left there is a dog house. We had yellow German Shepherd (it was my brother’s dog, my mom and dad got it for him before I was born) named “Pebbles”. Yes the same “Pebbles” from the Flintstones. You can also barely see the porch to the right, and the car was my Dad’s (I think) Pontiac 442. This is also the part of the yard where a bumble bee got his stinger stuck in my pants right on my knee and stung me like a dozen times.

I had a lot of good memories here. By the time I was in 2nd grade, my dad built a house in another town about 15 minutes away and I had a whole new set of adventures there.

Herbie the Love Bug

Herbie has to be one of the most famous cars from the 70s.

Herbie the Love Bug
Herbie the Love Bug

I watched Herbie in the movie “Herbie Rides Again” in a theater when I was kid. Of course it was very remember-able for me, because it was one of the rare occasions we were able to see a movie on the big screen.

 

https://youtu.be/sMnYBHUdk84

 

Some fun movie facts from IMDB

“When beginning production of the film, Disney set up a casting call for about a dozen cars, and kept them outside the studios for the crew to examine during their breaks. Among the lineup were Toyotas, Volvos, and of course, the pearl white Volkswagen Beetle. When the crew walked by to inspect the cars, they would kick the tires and grab the steering wheel to see how it handled. However, when they came across the Volkswagen, they began to pet it, and so the Beetle got the job. ”

I always wondered where the idea came from. Found it at IMDB:

“The movie was made and released about seven years after its source novel “Car, Boy, Girl” by Gordon Buford had been first published in 1961.  ”

Herbie got his name when the crew of the film was watching one of Buddy Hackett’s skits about a ski instructor with a funny accent. Then Hackett said, “If you ain’t got a herbie [pronounced hoy-bie], I ain’t goin’.” The name stuck.

The number 53 came from the famous baseball player Don Drysdale’s jersey.

GE Show N Tell from 1972

This was a neat little gadget. It’s like combining a view master with a phonograph.

GE Show N Tell from 1972
GE Show N Tell from 1972

The first one includes a radio and the second one is without. Some of the available programs where Mickey Mouse, Fairy Tales, Captain Kangaroo, and some Christmas stories.

Mutual of Omaha’s Wild Kingdom

One of my favorite shows during my childhood. The original series ran from 1963 to 1988.

Mutual of Omaha's Wild Kingdom
Mutual of Omaha’s Wild Kingdom

Wild Kingdom stared Marlin Perkins with his assistant Jim Fowler.

Marlin Perkins
Marlin Perkins
Jim Fowler
Jim Fowler

I remember this show being broadcast on Sunday afternoons. It really brought many amazing sites to your living room from all around the world.

Ho Scale Train Accessories from 1976

I had several of these accessories for my train set.

Ho Scale Train Accessories from 1976
Ho Scale Train Accessories from 1976

The ones that I can remember are the lighted water tower, remote control unloading dept, the automatic crossing gate, and the rolling bridge.

One of my friends, from a long time ago, was also into HO scale trains. He always talked about setting up a train track along the walls of his house at almost ceiling level.

I don’t know if he ever did it, but to this day I catch myself looking at the walls and ceiling in my house trying to figure out if a train track would fit there.

Tyco Racing – Curve Huggers from 1976

Wooo!, this racing set has 54′ feet of track and it’s lighted.

Tyco Racing - Curve Huggers - 1976
Tyco Racing – Curve Huggers – 1976

It also comes with a lane changer, lap counter, and a High-bank curve. Even the cars have working headlights. This is a huge set with a huge price to go with it. $49.88 was a lot of money in 1976.